WELCOME TO THE 21 DAY EQUITY CHALLENGE DAY 12!

ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACEs)

“To be young, gifted and black, 

Oh what a lovely precious dream 

To be young, gifted and black, 

Open your heart to what I mean.” 

-Nina Simone 

In order for children to meet developmental milestones, learn, grow, and lead productive lives, it is critical that they are healthy. 

  

Good social-emotional skills and mental health are key components of children’s healthy development. Poverty, trauma, and inadequate treatment are three factors that have been shown to have a sustained, negative impact on children’s social-emotional skills and mental health. Stressors external to the home, such as racism and discrimination, are community-level Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) – incidents that have the potential to dramatically disrupt a child’s ability to thrive. 

 

ACEs disproportionately impact children of color. In addition to experiencing trauma within our systems and environments, toxic stress can change a person’s genetic code, influencing how future generations respond to stress within their bodies and their risk of poor health outcomes. While trauma impacts all racial and socio-economic groups, groups that report higher rates of childhood trauma include adults of color, women, and those in poverty. 

  

In addition to addressing the systems and policies that negatively impact families, fostering connections can help disrupt the long-term impact of trauma. 

 

  

 

 

Today’s Challenge: Do one or more of the following

Watch

Watch the short video Cultural Competence Continuum, from Bill Deans, adapted from a paper by Terry Cross.

Watch

It’s relatively easy for us to experience another culture today through film, television, and social media. All this connection can inspire genuine cultural appreciation. But cultural appreciation can easily turn into cultural appropriation. Instead of honoring another culture, appropriation demeans and dishonors. See the reactions and hear the messages of young women as they come face-to-face with culturally appropriative costumes.

Assessment

Cultural Competence starts with self-awareness. Take this Cultural Competence Self-Assessment adapted from a checklist from the Greater Vancouver Island Multicultural Society. This tool is designed to help you consider your skills, knowledge, and awareness of yourself in your interactions with others and to assist you to recognize what you can do to become more effective in working and living in a diverse environment.

Read

People often wonder about the term, "cultural humility" vs "cultural competence." Read the article Cultural Competence or Cultural Humility? Moving Beyond the Debate by Ella Greene-Moton and Meredith Minkler, DrPH, MPH that discusses the origins of the terms within the health field and ultimately, recognizes that pursuing the path of "both/and" is good practice.

Assessment

For organizations or businesses looking for the “next step," consider the Intercultural Development Inventory. The assessment helps identify the mindset your team is using when making decisions that impact equity and inclusion, and helps to pinpoint the kinds of developmental activities you need to focus on to move to the next level. You’ll work with a qualified administrator to receive and interpret your results.

JOURNAL & DISCUSSION GUIDE

Capture what you learned by journaling your thoughts and feelings about today’s content. Download the free journal page for today. If you are participating in the Challenge as part of a group, download the free guide to help facilitate discussion.

DAY 5 JOURNAL

DAY 5 DISCUSSION

TOMORROW'S TOPIC

WEALTH AND INCOME